Impact – 1

It’s been a while since I’ve posted. I have been considering redesigning this website and, because of this reason, I have been gathering inspiration from several sources: the blogs and websites of others, lists of the “dos and don’ts” of scientific communication, etcetera. I’d also love to incorporate more infographics, somehow… but this takes time and skills! In any case, more about this in due course.

For now I’d like to guide your attention to a blog post I have written for the UK Data Service, part 1 of a series, which can be found here. Reflecting. on this concept, as well as what I’ve written, I think ‘impact’ is a very interesting concept, one that guides where most of the funding goes in academia, yet which is difficult if not impossible to accurately measure. In some ways this measurement is not fair, because it creates ‘winners’ and ‘losers’. However, life isn’t fair, and for the sake of supporting (potentially) impactful research, the use of measurement can be regarded as a necessary evil.

Impact again.jpg
‘Impact’ Wikimedia Commons, CC BY

Research Data Impact Fellow

I am delighted to share that starting this month I will be taking up a 2-year fellowship with the UK Data Service as a Data Impact Fellow.  This fellowship programme helps a number of researchers who are using UK Data Service data with making an impact by supporting public engagement activities.

A blog post summarising my research project as well as my plans can be found here, on the Data Impact Blog.

Let’s impact!

The value of context-specific communication and interdisciplinarity

In my spare time I sometimes work for a foundation. This foundation wants to communicate academic research in the fields of marketing, PR, advertising, etcetera, to practitioners. Think about marketeers, business owners, PR specialists…

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Lessons learned: being a ‘digital scholar’

When I attend PhD training sessions, courses and events, we are always reminded that a successful PhD candidacy (at least somewhat, and perhaps even largely) depends on making an impact. In brief, being impactful = PhD success.

Knowing this, I have been reading about how to be an ‘open scholar’ or ‘digital scholar’. This is because I believe that (junior) academics rely on digital platforms for sharing knowledge and information. One of the books I’ve been reading is Martin Weller’s The Digital Scholar (2011)

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A Committee Event

On July 10th, I attended an event organised by the Committee on Standards in Public Life (CSPL), called Setting the Standard – CSPL looks ahead in London. This was an event where together with academics, members of central and local government, regulators, academics and others, the CSPL discussed the content of their annual report, their understanding of current and developing issues, as well as their ‘forward plan’  and ‘strategic plan’. They opened the floor for feedback and specifically mentioned their desire and need for collaborations.

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Social Media and Social Cohesion (Seminar)

A little bit over two weeks ago I attended a week-long seminar – sponsored by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW, name dating to 1851 but founded by Louis Bonaparte in 1808) and the Hendrik Muller Fonds – about social media and social cohesion in Amsterdam, in the beautiful Trippenhuis (a Dutch heritage site and former museum, once housing Rembrandt’s ‘The Nightwatch’).  Continue reading “Social Media and Social Cohesion (Seminar)”