Impact – 1

It’s been a while since I’ve posted. I have been considering redesigning this website and, because of this reason, I have been gathering inspiration from several sources: the blogs and websites of others, lists of the “dos and don’ts” of scientific communication, etcetera. I’d also love to incorporate more infographics, somehow… but this takes time and skills! In any case, more about this in due course.

For now I’d like to guide your attention to a blog post I have written for the UK Data Service, part 1 of a series, which can be found here. Reflecting. on this concept, as well as what I’ve written, I think ‘impact’ is a very interesting concept, one that guides where most of the funding goes in academia, yet which is difficult if not impossible to accurately measure. In some ways this measurement is not fair, because it creates ‘winners’ and ‘losers’. However, life isn’t fair, and for the sake of supporting (potentially) impactful research, the use of measurement can be regarded as a necessary evil.

Impact again.jpg
‘Impact’ Wikimedia Commons, CC BY

Social Media and Social Cohesion (Seminar)

A little bit over two weeks ago I attended a week-long seminar – sponsored by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW, name dating to 1851 but founded by Louis Bonaparte in 1808) and the Hendrik Muller Fonds – about social media and social cohesion in Amsterdam, in the beautiful Trippenhuis (a Dutch heritage site and former museum, once housing Rembrandt’s ‘The Nightwatch’).  Continue reading “Social Media and Social Cohesion (Seminar)”

Lessons learned: managing research data

As undergrads, postgrads and even PhD (or PGR) students, we receive constant reminders that we need to save our research data at multiple places and frequently, both from teachers, supervisors and peers. There are also conferences and symposia dedicated to underlining the importance of making data available and replicability. However, by taking an online course provided by my University, I’ve recently learned that to ensure replicability and the later availability of your data, there are more steps you should take. These are the lessons I’ve learned… Continue reading “Lessons learned: managing research data”

Short trips to Cambridge and Edinburgh

I have to admit I’m guilty of staying within my comfort zone quite a bit. As a result, I haven’t traveled much since moving to the UK. However, trying to make a change, I have recently visited a friend in Cambridge and met up with another friend in Edinburgh, Scotland, both for a couple of days. Continue reading “Short trips to Cambridge and Edinburgh”